RSL Millworks | Woods

Our Wood, Species & Wood Grade Descriptions

You want the floor of your dreams... to be designed by Ralph Stuck Lumber & Millworks!

All of our beautiful and unique flooring is ¾" thick with tongue and groove running precisely down the center of the edge to allow the installer the opportunity to use the best side of the product.

Our product is kiln-dried to between 6 and 8 percent moisture content, depending on the species. We sell the flooring in random widths and lengths as per your needs. Prices are per square foot.

The floor of your dreams can be designed by our design department. Wrap around floor designs with 45 degree miters are just a sample of what our design department is capable of creating.

Custom millwork is not a problem for our design or manufacturing departments. If you are looking for custom stair treads and risers, moldings, or posts and handrails, we will be happy to help you.

We have "Profile Knife Grinding" equipment on our premises and employees who are highly skilled and capable of running the equipment to achieve the desired results.

Click any image for a larger view of our beautiful custom wood flooring

Random width knotty pine floor photo. Used in old farmhouse restoration. This is a random width Knotty Pine floor used in the restoration of 200 year old farmhouse.
Photo of random width red oak floor with walnut banding to create spectacular formal dining room. This is a random width Red Oak floor with Walnut banding with 3" interval between bands and 45 degree miters on corners to create a spectacular dining area.
  This is a stunning Red Oak floor used random width (3", 4" and 5") pieces of flooring. They were used to create a very intimate setting in the customer's new home.
This is an absolutely breathe taking, one of a kind creation. There are 18 different woods used in this floor. Curly Red Oak, Walnut, Curly Maple, and Cherry are just a few of the woods used in this floor.

Click any image below for a larger view of our beautiful woods

Photo of American Ash WoodAmerican Ash: Often an unappreciated wood by woodworkers. It is inexpensive, it works well & can be stained to resemble red oak. Sapwood is nearly white with the heartwood being light brown to yellowish. Grain is straight, course and even textured. Photo of American Beech WoodAmerican Beech: This wood is in the moderately priced range. It works well, is very sturdy and durable. It is also easy to finish. The heartwood is white to pinkish, to reddish brown. It has conspicuous rays & pores with a straight interlocking pattern. The grain is close with a fine texture.
Photo of American Red Oak WoodAmerican Red Oak: It is a very popular wood within the United States. It is moderately expensive. It works well. The sapwood is grayish white to pale reddish brown; the heartwood is pinkish to light reddish brown. The grain is straight, with a course texture. Photo of American White Oak WoodAmerican White Oak: This wood is very resistant to wear, insects, fungi and is practically waterproof. It is moderately expensive. The sapwood is whitish to light brown; the heartwood is rich light brown to dark brown. The grain is straight, with a course texture.
Birch: This wood has a smooth, dense surface free from pores. It is an easy wood to finish. The sapwood is white, and the heartwood is cream or light brown tinged with red. Grain is straight, close and has a fine texture. Black Walnut: This is a moderately priced wood. It has been prized for custom furniture and cabinetry. Can be highly figured. The sapwood is whitish to yellowish brown; the heartwood is a light grayish-brown to rich chocolate brown to a deep purplish brown. The grain is straight to interlocked, curly or wavy with a medium coarse texture.
Cherry: A highly prized wood in the United States. This is a moderately expensive wood. It cuts cleanly, polishes well and turns to a rich red as it ages. The sapwood is nearly white, the heartwood is light pinkish brown. The grain is straight with a fine close pattern. Eastern White Pine: This is a very inexpensive wood. The sapwood is nearly white to pale white; the heartwood is creamy to light reddish brown. The grain is straight with a fine texture.
Hard Maple: This wood is famous for exhibiting rare figures in some trees: wavy, curly, quilted, blistered, fiddle-back, burl and bird's-eye patterns. The workability can be difficult because of the hardness of the wood itself. The sapwood is white to creamy white; the heartwood is creamy white to pinkish tinge to light reddish brown. Grain is straight with a fine texture. This wood is the type of wood that is used for bowling alleys and dance floors. Hickory: Relatively inexpensive wood. Workability can be difficult because of the hardiness of the wood itself. The sapwood is nearly white, the heartwood is creamy to pinkish brown. The grain is straight, close and fine textured.
Soft Maple: Resembles hard maple, but is not as heavy and is much easier to work. The sapwood is white; the heartwood is gray-white to pinkish tinge to light reddish brown. The grain is straight with a course texture. Yellow Poplar: Another very inexpensive wood. Gaining popularity for a substitute to clear pine. The sapwood is nearly white; the heartwood is yellow to tan to greenish brown. The grain is straight, with a fine to medium texture.